lybra

more information.

Project by Allie Langohr, Changhee Han, Rozy Penaloza, and Marta Nikita.
Challenge

The average person spends less than 20 minutes a day reading the news. They are increasingly using digital sources to learn what's going on in the world. Many of us are familiar with scrolling through Facebook and seeing the same news publications and topics pop up over and over, with the same opinions being represented from the same friends. We wanted to end this.



Lybra is designed to break the echo chamber, the cycle of monotonous and hazardous news and perspectives that are endlessly fed through social and mainstream media.



Lybra provides a revolutionary way of reading the news. The goal is to break people out of the echo chambers that exist and persist on other social media platforms. It encourages people to read the other sides of a story so that they can gain the most comprehensive understanding of world events.

The Design

Our design was informed by the idea of the political spectrum. While we recognize that this spectrum exists beyond a simple left to right line, we worked with this concept to simplify how we visually represented a complicated concept, and to address the affiliations many people typically claim to have.

We chose to focus our app for U.S. audiences and those interested in U.S. politics and news. We are seeing a left/right divide in the U.S. growing during the time leading up to the election and after Donald Trump became the President of the United States. For this reason, the Democratic symbol of the Donkey and the Republican symbol of the Elephant are used at each end of the spectrum to demonstrate the overall bias of the publication and its readership for each story.

Though most publications tend to veer more towards leftist opinions and perspectives, the publications we chose were taken from a spectrum created by the Pew Research Centre and, we believe, showcase a broad enough variety of perspectives to be able to represent the many varying opinions that exist among the American people.

The purple colour we chose represents the middle ground between, or the blurring together, of the blue and red colours that represent the left and right. This colour was chosen to make the app seem as objective as possible